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A Hoppin' Good Time: Inside California's Creepy New Bunny Museum A Hoppin' Good Time: Inside California's Creepy New Bunny Museum

Photos by Amy Lombard

A Hoppin' Good Time: Inside California's Creepy New Bunny Museum

Apr 16 2017

After an extensive renovation, the Guinness World Record's largest bunny collection has reopened—and just in time for Easter.

"What you could mention, if you feel like it, is that we are a museum—not a petting zoo," Candance Frazee says about the frustrations she encounters with some visitors of her Bunny Museum in Altadena, California. "You can't go to the Getty and touch everything."

Let's just say this isn't your typical museum. You won't find works of art, but you will find something far more approachable to the masses: roughly 33,000 pieces of bunny memorabilia.

The museum opened in 1998, but the collection began years prior when owners Candace Frazee and Steve Lubanski started their courtship. "I would call him honey bunny," Frazee recalls. "On our first Valentine's Day, he gave me a plush bunny, and then on Easter I gave him a porcelain one. He couldn't wait for the holidays any longer, so it became exchanging a bunny every day as a love token. It's a love story, really."

This is both the greatest love story of all time, and why the couple holds the Guinness World Record for having the largest bunny collection in the world. After years of a successful marriage that resulted in thousands upon thousands of bunnies, the Bunny Museum relocated from Pasadena to Altadena to accommodate the growing collection.

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Here you'll find their entire collection on display, from the White House Easter Eggs to a collection of bunny garden statues. A noteworthy addition since the expansion is the Chamber of Hop Horrors, a room that only visitors 13 and older may enter. This room has no shortage of creepy bunnies from the 30s, 40s, and 50s, protest art, rabbit dog food, and a bunny with a cigarette in its mouth.

Unlike cats and dogs, bunnies keep their innocence and youthful appearance as they age, which is what draws Frazee to the animal. If you feel the same way, and are looking for a "hoppenin" good time in Southern California as the owners would tell you, pay the Bunny Museum a visit.

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