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Adam 'Pacman' Jones, Cornerback, Accused of Assaulting Five Separate Women

Broadly Staff

Broadly Staff

via USA Today Sports

Position: Cornerback
Height / Weight: 5'10" / 180 lbs
College: West Virginia University
NFL draft: 2005 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6
Career history: Tennessee Titans (2005–2006), Dallas Cowboys (2008), Cincinnati Bengals (2010–present)


In August 2006, a woman accused Adam Jones of spitting in her face at the Sweetwater Saloon in Murfreesboro, TN. According to ESPN, she filed a complaint with police, but did not seek an arrest warrant against him. Jones, however, was arrested in a separate incident that night and charged with disorderly conduct and public intoxication. At a January 2007 court hearing, Jones agreed to complete an anger management course provided by the NFL. The misdemeanor charges were dismissed in January 2008 on the recommendation of District Attorney General Bill Whitesell, who said Jones was close to completing the anger management course.


In October 2006, Jones was issued a citation for misdemeanor assault for allegedly spitting in the face of a 21-year-old Tennessee State student named Krystal Webb at a nightclub in Nashville. Webb told the police that Jones had attempted to dance with her friend, whom she pulled away. According to Webb, Jones then cursed and yelled at her and spit in her face. Jones' attorney Worrick Robinson said it was a case of "mistaken identity."

According to ESPN, Jones was suspended for one game on November 5, 2006 by his team at the time, the Titans, for violating the personal conduct policy. On February 1, 2007, the assault charge was dismissed. Judge John Aaron Holt said there were too many inconsistencies in Webb's story.


In February 2007, according to court transcripts from a criminal proceeding (described below), Jones entered Minxx Gentlemen's Club and Lounge in Las Vegas with "about $80,000" in cash, $40,000 of which was exchanged for singles. Amateur video, which was used as evidence in court, shows Jones throwing large handfuls of cash on the club's exotic dancers, a move colloquially known as "making it rain." According to court documents, Jones became enraged when a dancer began collecting the money he'd thrown on the stage and "the Detective's investigation confirmed that Mr. Jones had grabbed a dancer by the hair and hit her." Jones denied the allegation of assault.

According to court documents, Jones and his entourage were escorted out of the club. Jones allegedly threatened to kill the club's employees. Shortly after, shots were fired outside of the club. A female patron was shot in the head. One of the club's bouncers was hit in the chest and arm. A second bouncer was hit in the hand and in his side, which severed his spinal cord, leaving him permanently paralyzed below the waist.

In June 2007, Jones was charged with two counts of felony coercion.

According to court records, it is unclear if the shooter, Arvin Edwards—who pleaded no contest to one count of attempted murder and was sentenced to four to ten years in prison—was a member of Jones' entourage, although it was alleged that the two were friends and that Edwards fired shots as a favor to Jones. In an affidavit for a search warrant—issued in April 2008—a detective swore that, following an investigation, it was discovered that Jones had paid Edwards tens of thousands of dollars after the shooting. Jones said he had been extorted and made the payments after being threatened.

In December 2007, Jones pleaded no contest to one charge of conspiracy to commit disorderly conduct in exchange for agreeing to testify in the prosecution of Edwards, according to his testimony at Edwards' criminal trial. Jones was given a one-year suspended sentence, one year of probation, 200 hours of community service, and anger management classes.

Later that year, victims of the Minxx shooting sued Jones for his involvement in the incident and the injuries they sustained. In 2012, after a civil trial, a jury ordered Jones pay $12.4 million in damages to the victims. Jones appealed the ruling, but in January 2015, the Supreme Court of Nevada upheld the lower court's decision.

In April 2007, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell issued a one-year suspension for Jones for violating the NFL's personal conduct policy.


In January 2008, Wanda S. Jackson, an Atlanta defense attorney, requested a warrant from the Fulton County Magistrate Court in GA for Jones' arrest, alleging he punched her in the face at an Atlanta strip club. One day later, Jackson withdrew her complaint and became uncooperative with police. No charges were brought against Jones.


In April 2008, Jones returned from his one-year suspension and was traded to the Dallas Cowboys, despite his off-field reputation. In January 2009, the Cowboys released Jones.

After being an unsigned free agent for the entire 2009 season, Jones signed with the Cincinnati Bengals in May 2010.


In June 2013, Jones was arrested by the Cincinnati Police Department in OH and charged with one count of assault after he allegedly "struck [a woman] in the head with a closed fist after a verbal altercation," according to the police report obtained by Broadly. In October 2013, Jones was found not guilty by a judge in the Hamilton County Municipal Court, who said in his ruling that video surveillance of the bar's patio showed the alleged victim pointing a beer bottle toward Jones' face. "The initial aggressor in this case was [the woman] with the beer bottle," Judge Robert Taylor said.

Jones did not return Broadly's request for comment.